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Khanith

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Khanith or Khaneeth (خنيث;  khanīth) is a vernacular Arabic term used in Oman and the Arabian Peninsula and denotes the gender role ascribed to males who function sexually, and in some ways socially, as women. The word is closely related to the Arabic word mukhannath (مخنث "effeminate"), a Classical Arabic term referring to individuals with an effeminate nature.[1]

John Money summarizes material presented by Unni Wikan in an article titled Man becomes woman: Transsexualism in Oman as a key to gender roles. According to this account, the mukhannath is the "bottom" in a male same-sex relationship.[2] Because of this, khanith are considered men by Omani standards and are often considered an "alternative gender role"[3] – and sometimes considered as being transgender or transvestites[4] – even though the khanith are still referred to by masculine names and are treated as male by the law.[3] Because of this confusion in terminology, many people refer to the khanith as khanith alone.[4]

The khanith are considered a specific third gender category in Oman. And although they behave like women and have same-sex relationships with other men, at some stage they may one day "become a man"  and give up their lifestyle for marriage and children.[5][6]

References

  1. Error on call to Template:cite book: Parameter title must be specified pp. 515–516. Garland Publishing Inc. (2000).
  2. Man (N.S.) 12:304-319, 1977.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Error on call to Template:cite book: Parameter title must be specifiedNanda, Serena (1990). Neither Man Nor Woman: The Hijras of India pp. 130–131. Wadsworth Publishing.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Error on call to Template:cite book: Parameter title must be specifiedResonance: Beyond the Words. University of Chicago Press (16 January 2015).
  5. Error on call to Template:cite book: Parameter title must be specifiedDeconstructing Sexuality in the Middle East: Challenges and Discourses. Ashgate Publishing Ltd (2008).
  6. Error on call to Template:cite book: Parameter title must be specifiedStephen O. Murray (2002). Homosexualities. University of Chicago Press.

Bibliography

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